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Wednesday, October 16, 2013

AGING BEAUTIES


Not far from where I am living is a large community garden. Patterns of rectangles set the garden in proper order. Dirt paths have become a menagerie of weeds yet still define the borders around the individual small plots  Together all the plots appear to me like a college trial garden -- a little bit of this and a little bit of that -- a botanical community.


The Mammoth sunflowers were still standing tall when I recently walked through the aging plant plantation that was devoid of humans. The sun shown down on the garden giving the sunflowers some of their last breaths of "growing" light. Mammoth's stand very tall with one gigantic seed-filled head  -- a bird feeding paradise. If the heads bend to the ground small mammals enjoy the bounty. 





What I enjoy about sunflowers is their ultimate beauty as they age through the growing season. Fall brings their dark seed heads -- advertising to birds, "here is my sustainable gift to you. -- come and enjoy,  I will give to you like the sun, rain, and wind has given to me through spring and summer." 

They remind me that one can still give the gift of nurturing in the fall season of their life. 

19 comments:

  1. I never saw sunflowers that huge in the Portland area when we lived there. Guess they are taking good care of them. Or could in be climate change???We have been having weirdly abundant crops here, too. And a month or two earlier than usual.

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    1. Hattie -- How did you like living in Portland? As a newcomer to the area I am astounded by the number of highways with heavy traffic. I guess it's because I moved here from a rural place. Will take some getting used to I guess. Hmm -- a month or two early -- perhaps it is the cyclical pattern or climate change as you question? So much to investigate here. thanks -- barbara

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    2. Barbara: I moved away from Portland 17 years ago, and the traffic was heavy even then. I don't know how much worse it would be now.

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    3. Yes the geography of the place means many bottlenecks too. We moved away from Portland 17 years ago, and the traffic was very bad even then.

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    4. Hattie -- Yes, I am not excited when I know I have to drive through Portland on the 5 or the 205. I feel like I am driving the highways around Chicago. -- barbara.

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  2. Sunflowers are popular with many including goldfinch, squirrels and me!

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    1. Tabor -- Do you roast the sunflower seeds? They certainly are a dietary treat for the wild ones. Love to watch them pick out the seeds. In KY I noticed they ate the seeds from my sunflowers from the outside rim to the near center. thanks -- barbara

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  3. Our sunflowers are done, and my eleven year old grand daughter plucked the seeds from every head, "so the birds don't have to.'

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    1. Joanne -- Your granddaughter is a sweetie. I'm sure the birds appreciate her effort. Does she ever save some of her plucked seeds for next years garden? thanks -- barbara

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    1. Kay -- Nice that you liked them -- thanks -- barbara

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  5. Giant Bounty...They are so fascinating. I didn't know how exactly the birds feel from them...I was told that they move toward the sun all day long as it moves through the sky. As usual, I not only love the photos which reflect the magificence of these grand flowers, but the depth of your writing...

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    1. Rita -- I know mine always seemed to follow the sun. In Kentucky there were wide swaths in fields filled with wild sunflowers -- not as tall or as big of a head as these on my post but beautiful in mass. Sunflowers come in all sizes -- smitten with all of them. You always leave such wonderful words in your comment to me -- thanks -- barbara

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    1. Vicki -- I've always been drawn to lichen -- so my "like" became a header and I thank you for your nice comment on it -- barbara

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  7. Gotta give sunflowers their due
    Provide lots of interesting images, well past the golden yellows.

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    1. Birdman -- Our gardening season is breaking down -- soon we will see you know what! -- barbara

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  8. Thank you for those worth. Yes, there can be beauty and life is past its middle stage.

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    1. RuneE -- Beauty can be found in all the seasons of life -- thanks for the nice comment -- barbara

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