.

.

Thursday, August 22, 2013

TAKING A BREAK FROM THE FRENZY OF MOVING




Old quilt and old "butt" basket ~~ Kentucky pieces



A couple days ago I knew I needed a break from this whole house/packing/paperwork phase that I have been grinding through. I realized that the process is like walking a tightrope -- not knowing if one will actually get to the other side.

Closing on this house was set for the 26th of this month and I haven't heard a thing from the bank. When I call they do not return the call. I cannot be released from this house until everything is final which means "closed on." This selling procedure is really primitive being it is the digital age. 

I have almost completed my packing yet feel I cannot leave until it is sold.



One of Something Olde's windows with reflections



So . . . I took a break last Sunday to enter another world that doesn't relate to selling a house. Berea has a great antique shop called Something Olde. Located a few blocks off Highway 75 on Chestnut street, it offers a world of real antiques with a friendly owner.




Phil Willett



Above is Kentuckian Phil Willett, a textile scholar, giving a spinning demonstration in the shop. Talking with him gave me some great insights about weaving textiles.  






Tagged items above -- sitting in a beautiful old cupboard bring a rich and nostalgic feeling to the shop.





Karen Todd



Caught off-guard while eating her lunch, Karen Todd, owner, takes a well deserved break. The shop is always busy with many buyers from out of state as well as the locals. 

If you need a break while driving Highway 75 that dissects the nation's midsection, I'd suggest stopping at this diverse antique shop in Kentucky.  



22 comments:

  1. Its always good to be able to distract yourself from the tension of 'waiting for something to happen'. That store you found looks great, full of objects with untold stories. Good Luck with the move.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. claggle -- I cannot find your blog address anymore. If you can give it to me I would appreciate it. Doing a complete reverse from the house saved the day for me -- I very much enjoyed it. thanks for the nice comment -- barbara

      Delete
    2. Barbara, I don't think I have a 'blog address' because I don't have a 'blog'. I am not sure I could do one as I am not a confident computer user. I follow some blogs, but have not dipped my toe in the water!

      Delete
  2. Unanswered telephone calls are very, very high on the frustration scale. Yes, you needed to do something refreshing. I love the cabinet; my eye went immediately the old quilt on display with it frayed fabric for all to see. Also Willett working barefoot, no pretense there. I hope they'll get your papers in order and the deeds signed on time.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. june -- Yes, Phil said it is more comfortable to petal with bare feet. His family roots in KY go back to 1790. He is full of stories and knowledge. I wish I had met him sooner. Regarding my home -- my mind is entering a phase of "come what may." Just tired of the procrastination by the banks -- thanks June -- barbara

      Delete
  3. I've been thinking of you lately, as I'm reading a book my neighbor passed along to me called, "The Rosewood Casket." It takes place in the mountains of eastern TN, but it's definitely all Appalachian! I'm not very far into it since I only have time to read a bit before falling asleep at night, but I'm enjoying the writing style.

    Buying and selling houses can be such a colossal pain, made far worse when realtors and/or bankers are uncommunicative! I don't understand a business that won't return phone calls. We were left on pins and needles when we sold our house and when we bought this one, the closing date and final deal always in doubt till the final second. It's a wonder so many houses change hands, given the difficulties and stress! I hope it all goes smoothly for you from now on, though the break you gave yourself sounded like a lovely way to spend one of your waning Kentucky days!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LOL - just noticed your header photo with "Folkways Notebook" written on the red brick building!! How clever! :-)

      Delete
    2. Laloofah -- I am not the clever one. My son is. Sometimes I send a photo to my software engineer son to put the wording on my header photo. I too liked the way he put the words on the side of my photo of a vintage building. I'll pass your nice comment on to him.

      I am beginning to realize that this buying and selling is very much a colossal pain. I have bought and sold in the past but the process now seems to promote mental anguish rather than good feelings.

      Whatever the outcome is, when this is over I am going to sit somewhere on a bench and meditate for a long while. Thanks for your comment on your trial of purchasing a house. ~~ barbara

      Delete
  4. You will miss these people and that atmosphere, I am sure. Glad you are getting a break from the stress.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hattie -- Read your Swedish artist post and enjoyed it. Looking forward to reading about your next artist feature (German) I like this idea of introducing us to regional artists that we hardly know but are wonderful.
      I will miss the culture of KY -- it is certainly unique. thanks -- barbara

      Delete
  5. This post must have taken your mind off moving. And no - you don't dare leave until you have officially "closed". If it the property is not closed on it's like nothing ever happened and what transpired before that means nothing.

    GOOD LUCK!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. One Fly -- Its funny the rituals that we in the US go through selling a house. Layers and layers of paperwork have become the norm for buying or selling. At one time a handshake was all that was needed. What does this tell us about ourselves? Thanks for the comment ~~ barbara

      Delete
  6. Selling a house is not meant to be easy. How else can the bank justify their charges? At lest you found something interesting to investigate.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RuneE -- I agree, the bank has to justify all their charges! I did enjoy the shop -- enjoying the spinning demo. A few hours away from work can do wonders. thanks ~~ barbara

      Delete
  7. I love the quilt and basket picture. Were you able to resist buying anything on your visit?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Vicki -- Thanks for the nice comment on the quilt and basket. I too thought they were wonderful. I will miss seeing all the old quilts and baskets that can be found in KY. There were lots of great things in the shop but since I am tight on U-Haul space I just admired what was there. ~~ barbara

      Delete
  8. Wonderful photographs, such fascinating people, would love to be there. Good luck with the house move, such a stressful time.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Carole Anne -- Can't wait till I am settled again. This transition time is unsettling as it is for anyone that goes through a move. Will enjoy investigating Utah and blogging about it. It will certainly be a change of folkways. thanks ~~ barbara

      Delete
  9. Replies
    1. I loved it too. The shop had several old Kentucky baskets -- so many wonderful things could be seen -- it took my mind off packing -- thanks -- barbara

      Delete
  10. I'm glad you nurtured your soul in such a meaningful & artistic way, Barbara. Yes, walking on a tight rope, but here's what I'm experiencing now. That difficult time of moving is fading, & in it's place, the delight I find in my new home & my new territory! Did the closing happen? You will be so happy when you're settled & it will have been worth the turbulance.
    We have a Civil War Quilt with an amazing story at our local history museum. I'm going to be doing some work around it with a library child/parent book group, as a volunteer at the library. So I've been learning a bit about the history of quilting in America & about the Civil War times. And I think of you & the folklore & history lessons you've shared here on your blog.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rita -- I was a quilt collector at one time. I read just about every book that was published on old American quilts. I am sure there is new information that has come out since my quilt research days. I found the black quilters played an important role in the south's quilts -- I imagine they were important during the Civil War period too. -- thanks -- barbara

      Delete