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Sunday, June 16, 2013

FOLKWAYS GARDEN SHED



Tomato plants stand guard by the folk garden shed. Old tobacco sticks give structure  to the growing plants. 

Standing brightly at the edge of a large family home garden is a shed that spells folkways. A metal skin covers the old wood garden shed. It brightens the end of a family garden that holds many heirloom plants passed down through generations of family --  white skinned cucumbers, old timey sweet potatoes, parker beans and mustard that joins tomatoes and greens. Seed saving is part of the family's tradition.

Madison County, Kentucky



20 comments:

  1. I love the different colors on that shed. Great photo as usual. I have missed you and your pics!

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    1. turquoisemoon -- I miss all of you bloggers -- always a treat for me to visit around and read such interesting things from each. My main project this summer is working on my home which was on the market to sell awhile back, then taken off, and now is being put back on the market. That, plus other "to-dos" has me spinning. Do hope you are enjoying the summer and "om" to you as you try not to swelter in the heat. thanks for the nice comment on the photo -- will be reading your blog ever so often this summer -- barbara

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  2. Great picture. Love the 'non faked' distressed look of the shed with its gutter pipes catching the rain water.

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    1. claggle -- Liked how you described the shed -- its look is just the natural way things turn out when you live in Kentucky country. That is what makes the area so "real." Have to check out your blog -- its been awhile. thanks for stopping by and leaving a comment -- barbara

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    2. Have you taken your blog off blogspot? Can't find it -- barbara

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  3. Nicely done. I can just imagine all the activities that have surrounded this over the years...and of course, all the good food.

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    1. Tabor -- This family garden hardly had a weed in it. Ginger, gardener and wife of "husband" gardener told me that the garden is suffering a bit as it got hit by large hail stones a few weeks ago -- they lost many of their young seedlings. This is the way of life when gardening -- nature calls the shots but it is a way of life I miss. thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  4. The sight, and the remembered smell of growing tomato plants, makes me hungry for their big red products in a couple of months (or maybe sooner). Nice to see a picture and post and good luck with the house projects.

    Also,thanks for featuring my blog.

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    1. June -- I feel the same way about tomatoes -- walking in the garden and picking a nice red one and getting the smell in your nostrils brings one a certain nostalgia of gardens long past and fresh tastes to begin. Thanks for the good wishes about the house. Always like to read your posts -- thanks -- barbara

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  5. Amazing how the building seems to continue to stand on those leaning blocks.

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    1. Michelle -- Somehow that shed will be standing in place years from now. This property is well taken care of -- house, outbuildings etc. Perhaps it looks like the blocks are falling but I think they have it rigged so it won't.
      thanks -- barbara

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  6. Barbara...love this photo! It is the perfect look for a garden shed filled with plants handed down through generations!

    Hugs,
    Jan

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    1. Jan -- thanks for stopping by and leaving a nice comment about the photo. Always fun to visit gardens in the country -- barbara

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  7. Most interesting and valuable family tradition. In all the years I did vegetable gardening I was lucky to live within a half hours drive of "Seed Savers" near Decorah, Iowa. There and in their catalgue were hundreds of varieties of heritage seeds, often with their family histories. For example, an Arikara bean given to and save by a pioneerfamily in North Dakata family from the Arikara Indians. That is the same tribe who sheltered Lewis and Clark on their epic journery one winter on the way to the Pacific....:)

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    1. troutbirder -- I used to buy seeds from Seed Savers when I had a garden. I always thought it would be wonderful to visit the place. You are fortunate to have lived so close. If anyone reading your reply today is interested in heritage seeds they should goggle them. Interesting story about the Arikara Indian's bean seed and Lewis and Clark. thanks for all the good info -- barbara

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  8. That is the very picture of rural bliss.

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    1. Hattie -- rural bliss is a good way to describe this shed and tomato plants -- thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  9. I love the patina of the shed -- and the solid contentment of the lifestyle.

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    1. Vicki -- There is a beauty in contented living -- for sure. This shed reflects this. -- barbara

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  10. Your Garden Shed is a piece of art! It looks so funky, attractive and useful, and the way you have utilized old boxes and stuff is even more clever. Please keep sharing some more innovative ideas too!

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