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Thursday, May 9, 2013

OLD VERNACULAR WINDOWS



The whole purpose of education is to turn 
mirrors into windows
Sydny J. Harris






Barn Window
Double Story Barn
Madison County, Kentucky






Six over six lights
Second Story Window
1814 I-House Paint Lick
Garrard County, Kentucky 






Log House Window
Mercer County, Kentucky
Source -- Library of Congress 



26 comments:

  1. I really like your new header. And the wondows carry a lot of emotion.

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    1. Tabor -- Thanks for the nice comments -- I find untouched material culture has such meaningful stories to tell us -- barbara

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  2. Barbara...these are awesome!!! Love the black & white one, but they're all cool.

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    1. turquoisemoon -- the black and white one is my favorite one too.I found it at the Libray of Congress site while the others are mine. The window dressings were so opposite in feeling from the log exterior. -- barbara

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  3. These are wonderful. I love old windows. The black and white photo is just outstanding....

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    1. Teresa -- I see so many old windows being thrown out by the curbside. I would like to save them all but have no room. thanks for the nice comment -- barbara

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  4. The quote at the top of this post is wonderful -- it went into my book of quotes to remember. The windows are fascinating. Details tell us so many things.

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    1. June -- Yes, I liked the idea of the quote that I took to mean that one can learn from looking out at the world instead of looking back at oneself. thank you -- barbara

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  5. How beautiful and sad at the sametime. There is something so touching about the curtains hanging in the window of that weather cabin.

    Beautiful photos~

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    1. Jan -- The log cabin photo was taken during the depression. I should find the photographer's name and include it. I have had the photo for such a long time and misplaced the name. So many thousands of photos to go through at the Library of Congress site -- thanks barbara

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  6. The last one for me! Windows in old houses are fascinating. They can tell a whole story, and with a little poetic editing they can tell even more.

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    1. RuneE -- What would we do without windows? They allow light to filter into our homes in a magic way. And, allow us to view our outside world as we move about our interiors. Appreciate your comment -- barbara

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  7. Can't help but wonder what stories these old windows have to tell! I imagine soft candlelight shining from behind them on chilly Autumn nights, their windowpanes covered in frosty patterns in winter, the joy of throwing them open to let in the first warm, fresh breezes of spring, and listening to the nighttime insects through them while falling asleep on hot summer nights.

    I found this just the other day, and it makes a pretty good companion piece your post! :-)

    30 Interesting Ways to Use Old Windows

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    1. Laloofah -- You have come up with some very good imaginative stories about these windows -- all good emotions associated with windows. I took a stroll through the Ways to Use Old Windows. Lots of good ideas! To think of all the doors, windows and other old house parts being thrown away. Just recently followed a trash truck on the road that was hauling away some thick old doors to the trash station. There is a historic museum home in Lancaster, Ky that has an auction every year to raise money. I think it was last year that they fixed up old windows and sold all of them. Always nice to see these old pieces being recycled rather filling our dump sites. -- thanks barbara P. S. Maybe in my second life I will have a storage facility where I would collect and sell old home parts. Just dreaming.

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  8. These are some sweet shots.

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    1. Michelle -- I took the first two and found the other at the Library of Congress site a few years ago. thanks for the comment. -- barbara

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  9. ... but I digress
    PICAYUNE: a strange name for an ex-newspaper, I think. What's the deal? What are the roots?

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  10. Birdman -- Hmm -- am confused -- barbara

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  11. I like the quote as well as the intriguing photos...:)

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    1. troutbirder -- thanks troutbirder -- enjoyed finding the photos -- barbara

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  12. Wonderful pictures -- windows really are magical.

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    1. Vicki -- old windows provide images for our imagination -- thanks -- barbara

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  13. You have captured the beauty of time, of age, of experience, of service...they are a contrast to the new & slick. Our popular culture reveres the smooth exteriors of youth, even going so far as to air brush skins of models in magazines. Thank you for showing the beauty of real life. Good Spring Day, Barbara!

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    1. Rita -- It does seem that we are moving further away from the "real" in our culture. I love to find the real in our landscapes and faces -- it reflects who we really are. thanks -- barbara

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  14. Just beautiful, I love the simplicity of this entry.

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    1. Sublime Birdy -- I feel simplicity in architectural pieces can be restful. And also simple architecture like I see at the Shaker Village here in KY. Some of us like ornate and some like simple - makes life interesting.thanks -- barbara

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