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Monday, February 11, 2013

UNKNOWN WINTER BIRD NEST

 Of course this is not a nest of an early bird that arrived just this  February. It is one that was vacated last fall and has been perched in my field entwined with two small saplings. It's a small cup shape with narrowing bottom -- cup mostly dried  grasses while bottom mostly leaves.  About 3  feet off ground.



I find that winter offers our eyes earthly beauty just as other seasons can. In summer my field's wild growth is high and that is undoubtedly why I missed the nest then -- now winter's die-back has exposed this hidden treasure.  I don't know what kind of bird/s built this constructed masterpiece -- perhaps someone can offer up a guess?


A remnant of a recent bit of snowfall can be seen at the bottom of the nest. I considered removing it to my indoor collection. But, I thought, perhaps it might be used again and decided just to enjoy it in its natural surroundings. 

24 comments:

  1. I suspect your appreciation of this treasure & your talent with the camera show the great beauty of this nest. I love that you are leaving it. Earlier this winter some people took a nest out of a tree from our public park at Portland Head Light. I asked them to leave it so that others in the park could come back to enjoy it, but they didn't. This is a natural masterpiece, so beautifully woven & more special due to the function that it served.

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    1. Sketch Wandering -- Oh yes, I see nests when I am out and about towns and stop to admire them. Sometimes I come back and they are gone. Perhaps the wind took them away or folks that love them. I only collect nests that are in peril -- and I don't have that many. I have one on my gutter that was used by an Eastern Peewee last summer. If they don't take up residence with it this summer I will remove it before a wind storm gets it. We have wind storms here ever so often as I live on a ridge. I thank you for the nice comment -- barbara

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  2. Bird's nests are masterpieces. Thanks for sharing because I love looking at them.

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    1. Birdie -- Yes Birdie, I love looking at them too! I have a tiny bird-nest that my oldest son gave me when he moved across the country from where I lived. That was many years ago and I still have it hanging on my wall cupboard. It has traveled with me through many states. thanks -- barbara

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  3. It could be a wren's nest as they seem to nest in the most dangerous places. But this is certainly a guess as I do not have a clue. Some birds will build from a previous nest but others want a totaly new nest.

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    1. Tabor -- I have a wonderful pair of wrens that live around me. They usually set up a nest in a bushel basket that I leave hanging on my shed. It provides a nice safe place. I have found that the wrens build a rather messy nest but I love it just the same. This nest seems a little too neat but maybe when they are out in the public eye they are a bit more careful about their nest, just kidding. I will watch to see if birds take over the nest this summer. thanks -- barbara

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  4. I love your nest photo. I never tire of seeing a bird nest. This one seems to be awfully low to the ground to be safe.

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    1. Dee -- Yes, this nest is low to the ground but it would have been well hidden when active as my field gets exceeding tall with various wild plants. Many bird species nest low to the ground especially if they have good cover. thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  5. May be an Indigo Bunting nest. I enjoy finding the old nests of birds in winter.

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    1. Grampy -- I believe you are right. I have been using Eastern Birds' Nests, a Peterson Field Guide to identify nests. I looked up your suggestion that it might be an Indigo Bunting. I looked at all the nests in the Peterson Guide and your suggestion seems to fit. If a bunting is using my field all the better. I have bluebirds and might have seen a bunting and thought it was another blue bird. Will be more attentive next summer. thanks for the suggestion -- barbara

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  6. Your photo made me want to go for a walk. I suppose that's the point isn't it?

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    1. Raining Iguanas -- To me a nature walk is the most inspiring -- thanks -- barbara

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  7. Good question but I have a hard enough time identifying the birds much less there nests. I did have a nest last summer on a pillar on my bird that both a an Eastern Phoebe built and used followed by a barn swallow. There it remains in hopes that it will be refurbished and used again....:)

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    1. troutbirder -- Now that is interesting -- used by different birds, both phoebe and barn swallow. I imagine the barn swallows refurbished the nest a bit before they used it. Although the nests are similar in size according to my handy Peterson Guide on bird nests -- the shape is a tad different. Your discovery of nest reuse would probably be of interest to the Cornell Lab. I am not an ornithologist for sure but this does sound unusual. thanks -- barbara

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  8. Such beauty -- we just have to keep our eyes open.

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    1. vicki -- thanks for the comment. As we know, there is a lot of beauty out there -- barbara

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  9. What wonderful photos of this beautiful nest! I really love the second one, especially - it truly looks like a piece of art, nestled (pun intended) so prettily between those twin saplings. I'm glad you left it there too, and hope the builder returns to it to raise another chirping family in the spring. Or that maybe they'll sublet it to some other winged friend! :-) Maybe you can quietly wander by there when the birds have returned to see if anyone has made a home of it again.

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    1. Laloofah -- It is amazing that mother nature can hide nests by blending them so well with the environment. If the summer growth had not died back I would never have spotted this lovely nest. And of course it is all synchronized -- field growth high, nest active -- growth die-back, bird family gone. Everything is amazing in nature. thanks -- barbara

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  10. At least it gave rise to a fine photographic subject :-)

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    1. RuneE -- Yes, the winter fields do give rise to investigating nature's remnants from its active summer. -- thanks barbara

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  11. It looks like a hummingbird nest to me.

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    1. Gregory -- thanks for the comment. This nest is about twice the size of a hummingbird's nest where the diameter being about 1.5. Also the hummingbird's is not as twiggy looking. But it is a cup type nest. Appreciate that you stopping by -- barbara

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