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Wednesday, August 1, 2012

DOWN BLUE LICK ROAD


Down Blue Lick Road one can see the remains of an old agricultural base -- now dotted with ranch homes on acreage. One wonders what this area looked like before the building splurge of the past thirty years. Who owned and worked the land? Who sold the land? I have a tendency to be theoretical as I ride down many roads similar to Blue Lick -- once farms now mostly  ranch type homes. The historical markers on the land appear as outbuildings and barns. Not many. Just a few to remind you that there are old memories that travel with the land.  

The small old barn above is slowly deteriorating. When it falls what will take its place? The fabric of farms is steadily being torn to shreds with only an outhouse there, a barn down the road, and perhaps a storage shed mingled in with the new garage.  -- not even farm houses seem to survive. 

Why are we in such a rush to let our farming past with all its beautiful structures fall into ruins -- almost right before our eyes? 


14 comments:

  1. Very cool picture! Yes, you are so right...they are falling into ruins. I saw a barn I wanted to get a pic of, but it was so hot and near a busy road. I need to go back and get it during the morning and before it's gone! Thanks for the reminder.

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    1. turquoiseemoon -- Yes, get your photo. I have missed out on some nice barn and outbuilding photos because they had disappeared by the time I got back to their locations. Play it safe on that busy road! -- barbara.

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  2. I wonder who lives in those ranch houses, where they work, where they get their food and so on.
    I guess this has happened all over the rural U.S. And yes, it is important to get pix of all these old buildings.

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    1. Hattie -- Perhaps the new generations. Many times land was split after grandparents had passed which resulted in small parcels and then perhaps split again as that was sold off. My opinion is that the values of the land were diminished. thanks for stopping by -- barbara

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  3. Hi, Barbara.....just wondering what the three red poles hanging on the side of this intriguing structure might be. In our area, we have many farmsteads that were simply abandoned when farmers purchased additional farms only to work more land. It breaks my heart to see buildings and homes left to deteriorate. I so enjoy seeing your pictures of rural KY...and the humble gems you find and share.

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    1. Interesting that in your area farmers are enlarging their farms by buying up older properties and allowing the old property structures to remain and decay. I have not witnessed this in Central Kentucky where I live. In a few hundred years we will have added another layer of archaeological digs to our land. thanks for the nice comment -- barbara

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  4. It has a lot to do with $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$.

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    1. Birdman -- yes, I agree, it does take lots of money with the current culture's mentality of not protecting nor preserving structures. However, community pride of place can contribute to protecting and preserving the material values of an area. Our culture has a throw-away mentality. thanks -- barbara

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  5. It would be great if more of these old relics survived.

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    1. Mamabug -- Perhaps the failure of keeping the relics sound is the mentality of the community in which it happens. Things are changing in some communities where folks are realizing the importance of these structures. thanks -- barbara

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  6. It's sad -- but I imagine an old couple whose children aren't interested in the hard work of farming needing the money that the sale of the old farm will bring.

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    1. Vicki -- I think that can be the case sometimes. But what about the new owners? Don't they have a sense of permanence that the structures are symbols of? --- thanks barbara

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  7. When I would show people old caches of photos & albums purchased in vintage stores, people would ask, "Why would anyone give those away?" Because there was no family to take them was my reply. Once I purchased of lovely book of tintypes that had belong to the family of the man selling them. My sense was not that he needed the cash but that their importance to him had passed. But we never know people's stories, do we?

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    1. naomi -- What a treasure you have in old photos. They are not as easy to find as they once were. I once had quite a collection myself but sold them during one of my many moves around the country. Your album of tin types must be especially nice to have. If only we could save old buildings as easily as we save old photographs. thanks -- barbara

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