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Friday, April 29, 2011

CRIMSON CLOVER AND CRIMSON AND CLOVER

A CRIMSON COLORED FARMER'S FIELD 
A friend had tipped me off about the beautiful crimson clover field that you see in the photo above. She told me it was lovely and I just might want to take a ride past the field. She also told me to take some scissors and a container so I could clip a small bouquet for home.


The field belongs to a farmer and is usually all green with various interesting weeds but this spring the field turned to a blanket of deep red crimson clover. 

CLOSE UP OF CLOVER IN THE FARMERS FIELD
Of course we know why farmer's plant clover in the fall to bloom in the spring. But usually the clover is either small blooms of white or pinkish purple. Seeing the large crimson clover blooms is breath taking when planted in a whole field.  The clover protects the land from erosion, nourishes the soil, provides winter cover for small animals, and in the spring lots of clover for the busy bees. 

MY BEAUTIFUL HOME BOUQUET
Of course I forgot to take a container and scissors to the field. I took my photos and thought how I would have loved to clip some of the clover. Then I remembered a few things. I had an empty large coffee cup in my car and a large knife in the back of my cab. I looked around the ground and spotted some large water puddles left from all the rain we have had lately. I was all set. I cut my clover, filled the cup half way with rain water, and filled the cup with the fresh blooms. Off I went. At home I placed the blooms in an old crock and sat down with a cup of coffee and thought about the fun one can have over such simple acts as being with crimson clover.



27 comments:

  1. Barbara,
    Wonderful photos, wonderful bouquet, wonderful old song that brings back a ton of memories. Thank You...........Tell the friend thanks for the tip.

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  2. Wonderful post -- beautiful field and bouquet. Reminds me of a couple of years I lived in Texas when suddenly the bluebonnets turned vast brown fields into blue beauties. Like a boy scout you're prepared, whether you plan to be or not.

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  3. Isn't it amazing!! We planted a field of it one year and it was spectacular--nevermind the fact that it's great feed and good for the land, as well!

    Beautiful!
    Elora

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  4. Grampy == Will tell the friend thanks. And I thank you for the kudos. That song is a favorite of mine from the 60s. It came to mind as I was writing this post -- and was glad to find it on YouTube -- barbara

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  5. Elora - I bet that was a beautiful site on your farm. Yes, I did read it was also good feed. I tasted it when I picked it and it tasted pretty good -- but I know you meant feed for the farm amimals not us humans. Or can humans eat it? I'm still alive after eating a few leaves yesterday. -- barbara

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  6. June -- I've heard about the blue bonnets in Texas. It would be quite a sight to see a field of blue. Sometimes I am prepared when I think I am least prepared. Probably many people feel this way sometimes. Thanks -- barbara

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  7. Beautiful stuff! We use it as a cover crop some years and it's painful when it comes time to till it in -- usually just when it's at the height of its bloom.

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  8. What a great picture! I would so love to see this around here!

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  9. Great song - brings back lots of memories! Your photos are beautiful, I love a field full of wild flowers, especially all pinky red. Glad you were able to harvest some to take home.

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  10. Vicki -- I imagine your neighbors are in awe when you plant the crimson clover. I have found that bouquets of the clover last a long time -- a nice early spring treat. -- barbara

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  11. Witch of Stitches -- Thanks for the comment. The crimson red makes one smile. I wonder why more is not planted? -- barbara

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  12. Farmchick -- Perhaps some farm on some country road has some of this lovely crimson clover. If you find some be sure and pick a bouquet. -- barbara

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  13. Your friend was right, it is lovely! I have an old crock just like yours, btw. It's perfect for your clover bouquet.

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  14. Your blog reminds me that Woman proposes and God disposes. How wonderful is this tale and the photos are fabulous. I haven't seen crimson clover in a coon's age, and I would love to have that bouquet in my kitchen. Heck keep the coffee mug for bouquets, it is perfect. Dianne

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  15. Great photos and a good teaching lesson about clover. This city boy learned something new today. Thank you :-)

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  16. Very pretty! I've never seen a field of those around here before.

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  17. Tess -- The old crocks are great for earthy bouquets. Thanks for your nice comments -- barbara

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  18. Janet -- You are not alone. In all my travels I had never come across a field like this. Thanks -- barbara

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  19. The Old Geezer -- Mother Nature provides beauty and we get to enjoy it. Such a deal. Thanks for the comment. -- barbara

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  20. Dianne -- Good idea. Another few things to my already full pack of necessaries when I am out and about with my camera. But it paid off so I guess a large coffee cup will stay in my cab. Thanks. -- barbara

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  21. Hi Barbara:

    Excellent picture of the field planted with Crimson Clover. We plant it every few years or so as a winter cover crop on our 1-acre garden and it certainly is spectacular in the spring. In fact, you can hear the constant buzzing of countless insects working the blooms from the house, which is about 500 feet away.

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  22. Never seen that before, thanks for sharing. They look so neat and pretty in your window. I saw a field of wild mustard that amazed me. Of course, they are just weeds but I will post it on my blog.

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  23. OOHF -- I might just try a small patch of it for next year's bloom as I liked my bouquet. It would be nice to hear and see the insects too. -- barbara

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  24. Diane -- I think wild mustard is beautiful too but it is invasive. Look forward to seeing a field of it on your blog -- barbara

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  25. ohhh love the fields but LOVE the song! ;-)

    Thanks
    Leontien
    www.fourleafcloverdairy.blogspot.com

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  26. Leontien -- Stopped by your blog. Found it interesting that you had a four leaf clover logo. Perhaps the clover pulled you into my clover post. Whatever did -- I'm glad that you visited. -- barbara

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  27. Can you tell me where this field of clover is? or even one similar in south alabama?

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