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Friday, September 10, 2010

VEGETABLE SIGN POSTED ON OLD FARM


Don't know what the paper with duct tape is for? Even though this sign just says tomatoes, cucumbers everyone knows it means --  that they are for sale at this farm. It is a sign that has a dual meaning; one is that farm produce is for sale and two, it is an example of local economies. And perhaps it can also mean that one can get some wonderful fresh stuff at this farm! Stop and support your local farmers and gardeners.

15 comments:

  1. That's us! Or at least LIKE us! The duct tape probably was advertising some produce that was no longer available...you think? Or maybe an addition to the sign they later thought better of! and decided to remove it...or..put it back again...or remove...nevermind! Great sign, Barbara! Have a wonderful weekend!

    Elora

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  2. We need one of those signs re tomatoes. ;-)

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  3. I love hand made signs. Do you have honesty boxes around the country roads too, where you pay and remove the produce yourself? We picked up some chestnuts like that over winter. Such a lovely way to be in trust with the community.

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  4. Barbara, I really enjoy your blog. Will check in and read what you're up to more often. Great photos and stories. Thanks for your comments on my Sage's Play blog, too and for including my blog in your list here. I am glad you had 17 gypsy years. And that you are living in beautiful nature. I am restless for both wandering and nature these days. Probably we will talk more about this and other matters.

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  5. LOL
    We see similar signs here - I bet they covered up an old, cheaper price that was advertised several seasons earlier lol.
    And, yes! Get the local produce when you can, beautifully sun-warmed and bursting with flavour :)

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  6. Jayne -- I think you are right. I take it from your comment that you do indeed support your local economies when it comes to fresh produce. Thanks for the comment Jayne. -- barbara

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  7. Gaea -- So glad you stopped by. Your blog SAGE'S PLAY is a good read. So many talented women bloggers online. Men too! This has been expressed by others online but I will repeat it -- bloggers are a creative and active group that connect as a community. Nice that you and the many blogs on my sidebar are part of it. -- barbara

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  8. Elora -- do you have a sign selling some of your produce? When I was a young mother I lived a few years on a farm. I had a large garden and had my children sell our extra produce out by the road in front of our farm house. They got to keep the money -- it was, you might say, their first job. They loved doing it. But we didn't have a sign -- just a little stand as we didn't have that much to sell.
    I liked your post when the whole family came to glean vegetables from your garden. What a neat idea that was. Thanks for the comment and have a good weekend too. -- barbara

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  9. Vicki -- Yes, you made me laugh with your comment. You do need a sign to sell all those extra hundreds of tomatoes that you have in your garden. -- barbara

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  10. LiD -- In the three years that I have lived in Kentucky, I have not come across any honesty boxes. When I lived in Oregon I came across them frequently. They are a terrific idea. Wonderful that you have them in your country! Chestnuts -- makes me wonder if you have native Chestnut trees. -- barbara

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  11. Thanks for dropping into my site, tailsofbirding.blogspot.com. I find the folk lore related to birds, and their history and human interaction, as interesting as the biology, and the birdwatching - such stories to be told.

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  12. Chris -- Your blog tails of birding is full of interesting tails of birds and also your blog has great presentation. Thanks for stopping by.-- barbara

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  13. I think we mainly have European chestnuts growing here in Victoria. I have heard of a native plant called a Moreton Bay chestnut, but I don't think they are a true chestnut. They have fruit that taste like chestnut apparently, but you have to prepare them in a special way due to toxicity.

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  14. LiD -- Thanks for answering my inquiry about your chestnut trees. Our chestnut, the native American Chestnut, was a beautiful, abundant tree at one time here in the U.S. Unfortunately we lost it due to a fungus disease that wiped them out. We also have lost another valuable native, our elm trees due to the Dutch Elm disease. Now we have another killer on the loose, caused by an insect, the Emerald Ash Borer. Predictions are that is will kill all the ash trees eventually in the U.S. All three of the above native trees were (and still are in the case of the ash) an abundant and valuable asset both economically and culturally.

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  15. Oh, Barbara, I feel very sad about that. Dutch Elm disease hasn't made it here (hoping it never does) , and we still have some very precious mature elms that were planted in the 19th and early 20th century. They are not native to Australia. I have to hope that a solution for the Emerald Ash Borer will be found.

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