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Monday, March 8, 2010

WATER STALACTITES AND FRESH DRINKING WATER

SPRINGS THAT SEEP FROM ROCK OUTCROPPINGS ALONG MY ROUTE -- LOWER LEFT HAND CORNER

This past weekend was sunny and rather warmish compared to what we have had this winter. This kind of weather brings out people as well as wild critters. You choose the category you fall into.

I figured it would be a good day to travel up to Climax where I could collect gallons of drinking spring water. It's a curvy, rural, climbing road to the springs but the beautiful views are unsurpassed for these parts. Almost non-existent traffic. Climax is neither a village, town nor city -- it's is just a country "spot."

Rock outcropping along my way produce seeping springs -- now frozen solid like cave stalactites.

CLOSER VIEW OF SEEPING SPRINGS, NOW ICE STALACTITES

Kentucky has large areas throughout the state that are geologically known as karst areas. What is a karst? It is a landscape with sinkholes, sinking streams, caves and springs. In the areas of the state that are considerd to be a karst landscape one finds limestone bedrock.

I live in a karst area and the route I was driving today continued along a karst landscape.


CLOSE-UP OF THE ICED SEEPING SPRINGS IN MADISON CO.

My route takes me from Madison County into Rockcastle County. According to the Kentucky Geological Survey, Kentucky is one of the most famous karst areas in the world -- formed over hundreds of thousands of years in a continuing process as water moves underground from hilltops toward a stream through tiny fractures in the limestone bedrock.

CLIMAX SPRINGS SEEPING FROM ITS OUTCROPPING, ROCKCASTLE, COUNTY.

After my pleasant drive I arrive at the "spot," Climax. Here a large natural spring flows down into a captured area where local folks can fill their many gallon containers with drinking water.

CLOSER VIEW OF CLIMAX SPRINGS

The surrounding area is pristine for miles and the water tests clean. The taste of the water is pure, void of water treatment taste. It's cold and free!

LOCAL RESIDENT COLLECTING FRESH MOUNTAIN SPRING WATER

The collection site is just down from the large spring area at Climax. Captured in an underground cement tank it flows up and through metal piping that has an on and off spigot. When you turn the spigot on, the water gushes out hard and fast.

Aren't I lucky to know about this place. Thanks Mother Earth.

4 comments:

  1. You know, Barbara, we have similar karst outcrops and one place in particular has a pipe jammed back into the hillside to channel the springwater and make it available to anyone who comes with a jug; it is not in any way developed. It's probably too skinny a space for any KIND of development. No parking space, except for one car. But what a BEAUTIFUL PLACE FOR GETTING SPRINGWATER YOU HAVE! A GREAT and GENEROUS IDEA there in Kentucky! The pipe in the hill near us, has been there since we arrived back in 1975. Many people use it as their sole source of drinking water, even today. We do take "running" water for granted, don't we?! Just depends upon WHERE it's running, right?! Today, I was in the Greenbrier County Library and went over to the drinking fountain, fully expecting to gag because of chlorine content. Not so. That water came from somewhere else! It was cold and soooo good! We have good water here on our farm. Really good, for which we're grateful. I fear in years to come, water will become more scarce and could be one of the most sought-after resources on the planet.

    Great post, Barbara!

    Elora

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  2. Elora,
    We are fortunate to have this wonderful water available year round from the Climax spring. I did find in my research of springs that one has to be careful about the effluence that can be carried along in spring water such as chemicals and other debris. You are right, we do need to worry about water around the world. I recently read that Saudi Arabia may have lots of oil but they are experiencing a scarcity of water. And, of course, we ourselves are contaminating our own water -- unfortunately, both inland and in our oceans. I believe that many of us feel we need to protect it. -- Thanks so much for the very nice comment -- barbara

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  3. What an interesting post! I grew up in an area of the Nebraska Sandhills where artesian wells (or "flowing" wells, as we called them) were abundant. When the water table is close to the surface and the water pressure great enough, an artesian well flows like a spring, once the well pipe is inserted into the ground. I remember the water of the flowing wells as very cold and sweet. What a treat it was to get a drink from a flowing well on a hot afternoon in the hayfield!

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  4. Genevieve -- I too remember well water in various places I have lived or visited. When I lived in Oregon there was a contamination scare in my area and the local government was checking well waters in the area free. Luckily I was free of contaminants. That scare brought home the importance of clean water in our every day life. Thanks for the nice comment -- barbara

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