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Tuesday, January 10, 2012

LIGHT IN MY WINTER WOODS























As dusk begins to move into my woods, the trees take on the winter sun reflecting amber light. My trees catch this light as it moves up the ridge in small incremental steps. Other winter trees stand in dusky shadows adding contrast to the now-amber hardwoods. 

I feel that winter has an ancient story to tell. The bare trees allow the wind to sing like sirens as it twists through the branches. Perhaps the wind is trying to tell us its story. 

I was raised in a state full of hardwoods. I became imprinted with this type of environment. I personally cannot live in an area without lots of trees. I know because I have tried. 



My woodland is young --  full of beech, maple, ash and oak plus other types. A few older grandmotherly types are inter-mixed with the young trees. They are remainders from the previous generation of trees which were cut by settlers of this land. A creek runs through this woodlands where children play in the summer and find fossils in creek stones. Ancient land. 

We are all ancients by our similar chemistry -- both trees and humans --we are telling our stories everyday to each other. What do you think the stories are? 


20 comments:

  1. The contrast in the photos is very beautiful. Whatever the grandmother trees would tell us would be full of invasion, disillusionment on the part of the invaders, maybe retribution for their greediness and heedlessness of nature, and the patience a truly old grandmother will have learned as she watches the young trees return, another cycle beginning. That's my version, surely there are many others.

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  2. What a beautiful photograph! I love the look of the light during the transitional times of day - dawn and dusk. So magical! You captured it beautifully, and your accompanying text is lovely and eloquent, too. I can feel the serenity, mystery, wisdom and antiquity of your woods almost as if I were actually there, hugging your trees as the sun sets. :-)

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  3. Love that amber light. Your descriptions are perfect and so eloquent. The ancients, yes. A beautiful post.

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  4. I love the concept of the Ancients.......
    so comforting.........

    Your photos are beautiful!

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  5. Mimi -- I too like the notion that we are all part of the ancients -- thanks for the nice comment -- barbara

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  6. Teresa -- If only we could all slow down and look at what is around us in the natural world. -- thanks for your comments on the ancients and amber light -- barbara

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  7. Laloofah -- your words -- serenity, mystery, wisdom and antiquity -- capture how I feel in nature -- thanks for the lovely words -- barbara

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  8. June -- grandmothers are watchful -- your thoughts on what grandmother trees would tell us seems to be coming true. Retribution in the form of climate change. Thanks for the insight response -- barbara

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  9. A thoughtful post, Barbara. I hope my stories are stories of peace, joy and laughter, while still recognizing the darkness that we all must pass though from time to time.

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  10. The trees often speak to me as I wander through the woods. Some of them tell me horrible stories about the abuses they incur because of human ignorance, apathy, or pure greed. Our hemlocks are telling me they will not survive the woolly adelgid infestations, carelessly brought here from Asia. I ache for the trees who gave their lives for the idiots who build on top of the mountain and sacrifice the trees for a better view.

    I love your young trees and the beautiful photographs.

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  11. Granny Sue -- Your stories and experiences are full of peace, joy and laughter. I especially liked the last one with the chest of drawers as it took me back into my life. Thanks for the nice comment -- barbara

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  12. NCmountainwoman -- The wooly adelgid infestation is new to me.How unfortunate to hear that another non-native insect is destroying our lovely trees. We have a symbiotic relationships with trees but some folks don't seem to realize this. Thanks for the information and the thoughtful words -- barbara

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  13. When I first sit in the woods there appears to be nothing just a bunch of trees. Before long as if accepted the magic of the filtered light enlightens my eyes. The animals and birds begin to move. My nostrils begin to pick up the scent. The silence evolves into the mystical sounds of the ages. I hear the breeze works its magic in winter the creaking of dried out branches. In summer the shooshing of the shifting leaves. By unsaid words I become aware that I am connected.

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  14. Grampy -- When one sits down in the woods it seems that they need to become focused and aware -- a different kind of awareness than the type done when going about errands, school, work, etc. Your description of how you work your way into your awareness is insightful. Thanks for the process of transition from a busy world to one of calmness in nature -- barbara

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  15. Birdman -- I do love Maine! I spent a vacation there years ago and fell in love with it. Not only the trees but the fantastic architecture. Thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  16. Your woods look like my daughter's woods. She has pilleated woodpeckers and owls everywhere. These woods are young woods too and will someday be old woods. I think we are all made of stardust and its a miracle. Dianne

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  17. Dianne -- Sounds like your daughter's woods has the same wild visitors as the one on this property. I find myself using "my woods" when in fact I feel that the land belongs to all. Just habit to say my woods. Thanks for the comment -- barbara

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  18. Beautiful -- and pretty much like where I live. I too need trees.

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  19. Vicki -- Yes, trees are wonderful to observe in wind also to help collect thoughts. Thanks for the comment -- barbara

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