Tuesday, March 8, 2011

SHADOWS OF A COUNTRY PLAYGROUND



Kentucky childhood dreams

A tall climbing tree,
long wood boards,
an old rubber tire, 
some strong rope.

36 comments:

  1. I love this picture, especially how the tire swing dangles from the tree. Reminds me of a tree fort my son and I built along the railroad tracks near our one time home in Illinois. Seems young people love to build these special places in wild spaces away from the prying eyes of adults- a retreat of sorts.

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  2. Darcy -- What a fun mom that builds a tree fort with her son. I do think that kids need a place to dream away from the adult world -- thanks -- barbara

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  3. Looks like something my kids would put together. They did build a tree house once, across the creek and back in the woods. I don't know if it is still there or not. I also have an old picture of my uncle sitting in an old tire swing when he was young.

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  5. Janet - Kids love forts -- I bet you built one when you were young. That would be a wonderful photo to see of your uncle sitting in an old tire swing. Thanks -- barbara

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  6. That's a beautiful shot, Barbara. It takes me back to when my kids were young and my husband built them a tree house. There was also a ragged platform in another tree, a memory of long-since grown children that predated my own youngsters.

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  7. Sheri -- I bet your kids developed some of their imaginative skills from that tree house experience. Maybe you remember a tree house or fort that you played in when you were younger. Thanks for the comments -- barbara

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  8. This picture is a good reflection of why my husband and I moved back to KY years ago. Hoping our kids could have a free country kid kind of life. Complete with treehouses and tire swings.

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  9. Wow!! This looks like my old tree fort. Lumber was so plentiful in the old days. It would cost your parents a fortune to build that tree fort today. Also, the hemp rope used to tie the tire is illegal to import today because the hemp used for rope is in the same family as the Marijuana plant....our government helping us again. I used to love the smell of the hemp rope, so fragrant.

    Do kids smoke rope these days??

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  10. This calls to mind climbable trees, in particular a big pear tree that, for a while, had a swing like that one. Nostalgia time...

    The quilt in your header is beautiful! Have you posted about it previously?

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  11. June -- I had a header with a Dresden Plate quilt pattern. Perhaps that is the one you are thinking of as it had circular patterns. I like variety so I tend to change my headers often.

    Oh yes, a mature pear tree would make a good climbing tree. thanks -- barbara

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  12. Love it!
    You know, some suburban councils here in Oz ban kids having tree houses, due to health and safety, insurance, etc.
    Another lost childhood pleasure!

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  13. Barbara, the header that's at the top right now is not at traditional Desden plate, maybe it's a throw and not a quilt. It's pieced like a quilt but not quilted, but embellished with embroidery. It's very handsome.

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  14. June -- I guess I didn't word my comment clearly. A past header's image featured a Dresden Plate pattern. The present header is not a Dresden Plate. The present header is an unquilted piece - I would call it part of a topper -- it is old and I don't know the pattern. Sometimes my mind is ahead of my writing and I become unclear when describing something. I hope I am describing this better. If not please let me know -- I can use all the help I can muster.

    Thanks for commenting back -- I do appreciate it.

    -- barbara

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  15. Jayne -- Oh what a shame -- will we someday be put in boxes and stored away on a shelf until we can become robots for the powers that be. Hope this idea does not immigrate to the U.S. -- or perhaps it has and I am not aware of it? Thanks -- barbara

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  16. Farmchick -- I took this photo in rural Garrard County, KY. Living in rural areas allows kids to wander outside enjoying their creative and investigative minds. Your son finding the beaver dam was one good example. Thanks -- barbara

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  17. Dianne -- I laughed at your remark about smoking rope. I wouldn't know hemp rope if I held it in my hand. I do remember a "goldenish" thick rope that had a farm smell to it -- perhaps that was hemp?

    We made our forts out of scrap wood and it looked like it! People used to save scrap wood like they did string.

    Thanks for the comments -- barbara

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  18. Rhonda -- Happiness is . . . many things to so many folks. Thanks for stopping by -- barbara

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  19. Daphne -- What fun for the children and maybe a few adults too. -- barbara

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  20. A ghosty, wintry, bittersweet image, if not for the invitation still in that tire swinging in the wind. - Brendan

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  21. Brendan -- yes, you captured the same feeling I got when I took the photo. And yes the tire swing still beckons.

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  22. I love this! Can't you just see the kids climbing all over it?

    Or maybe...the swing was for the bored hunter in the tree stand? :)

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  23. Oh, what a strong image that photo is!

    I still remember the joy of a bag swing on a jacaranda tree in my grandparent's back yard and the feel of the rough bark on my bare feet.

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  24. Vicki -- Never heard of a bag swing or a jacaranda tree. Sounds deep south to me. Please fill me in. -- barbara

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  25. Granny Sue -- yes, I can envision the children. I know the boards do resemble a hunters tree stand but this playground was located very close to the side of a county road. I'm pretty sure a hunter would not hang out there. Thanks for stopping by -- barbara

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  26. This upwards shot has me thinking about lots of treehouses in my youth. And btw Great banner!

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  27. Thanks for joining me, Barbara, I love your blog and anything to do with folk art and craft.

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  28. This sure brought back some wonderful memories! I never had a tree house (but climbed trees every chance I got!), but I did have a cool two-story fort beneath a huge Weeping Willow. It had come with the house we moved to when I was four and I got to enjoy it till we moved away when I was eight. And I had a tire swing that I insisted my dad put up for me - when I was in high school! (It took me a long time to grow up, if indeed I ever did!) :-) The hours of fun we could have with such simple things. Who needed X-Boxes or Gameboys?!

    I have some fun "grownup" treehouse pictures and links on this post that you might enjoy!

    By the way, I love how your header changes, they're all so perfect!

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  29. Birdman -- treehouses seem to be a fairly national pastimes of children of all ages in this country. Privacy and imagination can be experienced in such places. -- Thanks -- barbara

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  30. Carole Anne -- thanks for stopping by -- you have an interesting post -- will be visiting you often -- barbara

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  31. Laloofah -- How lucky to have a ready-made fort to play in when you moved into your new house at the young age of four. I visited your treehouse site and enjoyed it. Good for you that it took a long time to grow up. Don't you think that no matter the age we should retain some of the child within us. Thanks for the header comment -- barbara

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  32. I just love all your photos. Got me interested now since I live in Tennessee and there are a lot of rural, broken down areas to see. I just love how clean everything was in that section you did of that 90 plus gentlemen. He must take good care of his plaCE.

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  33. Indeed I do, Barbara! :-) And I'm glad you enjoyed my tree/treehouse post! I had fun working on that Arbor Day post trilogy. (Wish I had that kind of free time right now!)

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  34. Diane -- I've traveled a bit in TN and find that it has wonderful rural and small town areas. I especially like to stop at the Appalachian Museum just off of Hwy 75. I imagine you have been there. Nice that you have a new pup. Love dogs. --- barbara

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